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NEDC e-Bulletin

Issue 21 | April 2014

university classroom researchers

Introduction: 

Welcome to the April edition of the NEDC e-Bulletin.

In order to raise awareness of the devastating impact of eating disorders on our society, education around the promotion, prevention, early intervention and management of eating disorders must be enhanced in both the general community and those working in the health, fitness, education and media sectors.

Research has shown that having the correct information and education about eating disorders can help prevent an eating disorder from developing and can decrease the severity of illness for a person in the early stages of an eating disorder. Education is also important in the reduction of stigma and misconceptions.

A person who has, or is at of risk of developing an eating disorder can often feel high levels of shame, ambivalence and denial. The person may need guidance and support from those around them to take the first steps towards preventing or treating an eating disorder. It is important that those who care for or work with people at risk of an eating disorder to deepen their level of understanding about these serious mental health issues.

This month the NEDC has made available a range of new and revised resourced on our website including messages for young people and carers, factsheets and professional resources for GPs, teachers and sporting coaches.

Below you will find an overview of some of our new resources. All of our resources have been developed from evidence based information and reviewed by eating disorders experts. We are also highlighting other resources available to professionals and individuals with a lived experience.

Contents

1. Eating Disorders in Schools: Prevention, Early Identification and Response

2. Eating Disorders in Sport and Fitness: Prevention, Early Identification and Response

3. Eating Disorders: A Professional Resource for General Practitioners

4. Caring for Someone with an Eating Disorder

5. Young People's Resource: 8 Tips for Dealing with an Eating Disorder

6. Other resources

 

Eating Disorders in Schools: Prevention, Early Identification and Response

teenagers in a classroom

People who are identified and treated early in the course of an eating disorder have a significantly better chance of recovery when compared with those who have been living with an eating disorder longer; this is particularly relevant for young people. However, the median duration of treatment delay is extraordinarily long (10 years for those meeting criteria for bulimia nervosa and 15 years for those meeting criteria for anorexia nervosa). This suggests that people with eating disorders experience significant barriers to seeking help. One principal barrier has been identified as the stigma that exists around eating disorders. To reduce the stigma associated with eating disorders, there needs to be a shift in the attitudes and knowledge of the general community about eating disorders. In Australia there has been a growth in mental health awareness and active efforts by government, media and the wider community to reduce stigma and improve mental health literacy. Schools are in a powerful position to help with these efforts.

This resource is written for education professionals working in schools to assist them in understanding eating disorders, promoting health and wellbeing within their schools, recognising and responding to eating disorders, and supporting students who are undergoing treatment for an eating disorder. The resource encourages a whole- school approach to eating disorders.

Download Eating Disorders in Schools
 

Eating Disorders in Sport and Fitness: Prevention, Early Identification and Response

male and female athletes

Sports associations play a large and ongoing role in the influence of people engaging in competitive physical activity and are therefore instrumental in delivering positive messaging about body image and healthy eating and exercise behaviours within a high risk community. Coaches and other sports professionals are amongst the most important and influential role models in the lives of the athletes they interact with, and as such, these people are in a strong position to assist in the prevention, early identification, intervention and management of eating disorders. This resource is written for sports professionals to assist them in understanding eating disorders, promoting health and wellbeing within their organisations, recognising and responding to eating disorders, and supporting athletes who are undergoing treatment for an eating disorder. The resource recognises the physical and mental health benefits of sport while promoting awareness of the risk factors that may be seen in sporting environments.

Download Eating Disorders in Sport and Fitness
 

Eating Disorders: A Professional Resource for General Practitioners

male clinician reading in australia

As a General Practitioner you are likely to be one of the first health professionals a person with an eating disorder will come in contact with. A General Practitioner’s role in the treatment of eating disorders can encompass prevention, identification, medical management in a primary care setting and referral. This resource is divided into three sections covering screening and assessment, referral to appropriate services and ongoing treatment and management. The resource encourages General Practitioners to act as an approachable ‘first base’ for those seeking help.

Download the professional resource for GPs
 

Caring for Someone with an Eating Disorder

Father and daughter

Family, carers and support services play a crucial role in the care, support and recovery of people with eating disorders and this resource is designed to assist these people in contributing to an effective collaborative care approach.

Download Caring for Someone with an Eating Disorder

The resource includes seven helpful tips for carers, which are depicted in the following infographic:


Click to enlarge

 

Young People's Resource: 8 Tips for Dealing with an Eating Disorder

young female in field

Young people go through periods of great change biologically, physically and psychologically. These changes can be stressful and can lead to feelings of insecurity or self-consciousness, which can increase the risk of developing an eating disorder. Although the onset of an eating disorder can occur at any age, it is most common in young people. This resource provides young people with some helpful tips about dealing with eating disorders and promotes the importance of help seeking.

Download 8 Tips for Dealing with an Eating Disorder
 

Other resources

The NEDC website has a number of other resources that may be of interest to professionals, families and carers and others affected by eating disorders.

We have updated all of our fact sheets with the latest research including developments from the 2013 publication of the DSM-5. Our fact sheets have all been redesigned to make them easier to print and handout. They can all be downloaded from our Fact Sheets page.

Education professionals can find more programs and resources for use in schools on our For Schools page.

Sport and Fitness professionals can find programs and resources on our Sport and Fitness Industry page

Those who work in the community can find programs and resources on our Community page.

Professional development courses can be found on our Professional Development page. Upcoming professional resources events can be found on our Event Calendar.

If you have any questions about these resources including how to implement them in your workplace, with your clients, or within your community please send us an email at info@nedc.com.au.

NEDC Logo White background
 

Find information for:

information for young people   information for health professionals

information for teachers and schools    information for families and carers
 

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