25 Years of psychological research investigating disordered eating in people with diabetes: what have we learnt?

About this resource

Disordered eating is a serious and under-recognized problem in people with diabetes. This narrative review summarizes the research contributions made by psychological science over the past 25 years to the study of disordered eating in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and identifies gaps and future directions relevant to both healthcare professionals and researchers. Key focus areas of psychological research investigating disordered eating in people with diabetes have been: (1) defining and classifying types of disordered eating; (2) identifying demographic, diabetes-specific and psychosocial correlates of disordered eating, and developing theoretical models of disordered eating in people with type 1 diabetes; (3) identifying the physical and psychosocial consequences of disordered eating; and (4) developing screening measures to identify disordered eating in people with type 1 diabetes. Psychological science has made significant contributions over the past 25 years to our understanding of the nature of this problem and the multiple factors which may interrelate with disordered eating in people with diabetes. Key areas for further attention include: (1) a better definition of disordered eating subtypes in people with type 1 diabetes; (2) characterizing disordered eating in people with type 2 diabetes; and (3) developing multidisciplinary, evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions for comorbid disordered eating and diabetes.

AuthorBroadley, M. M.; Zaremba, N.; Andrew, B.; Ismail, K.; Treasure, J.; White, M. J.; Stadler, M.
JournalDiabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabe
Volume37, 401-408
Year2020

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