Cognitive behavioral therapy guided self-help and orlistat for the treatment of binge eating disorder: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

About this resource

Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has efficacy for binge eating disorder (BED) but not obesity. No controlled studies have tested whether adding obesity medication to CBT facilitates weight loss. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study of orlistat administered with guided self-help CBT (CBTgsh). Methods: Fifty obese BED patients were randomly assigned to 12-week treatments of either orlistat plus CBTgsh (120 mg three times a day [t.i.d.]) or placebo plus CBTgsh and were followed in double-blind fashion for 3 months after treatment. Results: Seventy-eight percent of patients completed treatments without differential dropout between orlistat+CBTgsh and placebo+CBTgsh. Intent-to-treat remission rates (zero binges for past 28 days on Eating Disorder Examination Interview) were significantly higher for orlistat+CBTgsh than placebo+CBTgsh (64 % versus 36 % ) at posttreatment but not at 3-month follow-up (52 % in both). Intent-to-treat rates for achieving 5 % weight loss were significantly higher for orlistat+CBTgsh than placebo+CBTgsh at posttreatment (36 % versus 8 % ) and 3-month follow-up (32 % versus 8 % ). Significant and comparable improvements in eating disorder psychopathology and psychological distress occurred in both treatments. Conclusions: The addition of orlistat to CBTgsh was associated with greater weight loss than the addition of placebo to CBTgsh. Clinical improvements were generally maintained at 3-month follow-up after treatment discontinuation.

AuthorGrilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M. & Salant, Stacey L.
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume57(10):1193-1201
Year2005

See also

Psychophysiological responses to idiosyncratic stress in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder

This study examined psychophysiological stress responses to idiosyncratically relevant stress in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), in relation to autonomic cardiac control and nutritional status.

Read more

Lisdexamfetamine for binge eating disorder in adults: A systematic review of the efficacy and safety profile for this newly approved indication-what is the number needed to treat, number needed to harm and likelihood to be helped or harmed?

Objective To describe the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) for the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED).

Read more

Recurrent binge eating with and without the undue influence of weight or shape on self-evaluation": Implications for the diagnosis of binge eating disorder"

Levels of eating disorder psychopathology, impairment in psycho-social functioning and use of health services were compared among probable cases of binge eating disorder (BED) with and without extreme weight or shape concerns ("undue influence of weight or shape on self-evaluation") recruited from a large community sample of women.

Read more

Loss of control eating with and without the undue influence of weight or shape on self-evaluation: evidence from an adolescent population

BACKGROUND: The overvaluation of weight and/or shape ("overvaluation"), a diagnostic criterion for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, is increasingly supported for inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DSM-5) criteria of binge eating disorder (BED).

Read more

Help us improve!

Give us feedback!

We will continue throughout 2020 to update and improve the NEDC website and welcome any feedback you may have on the site.

Provide feedback